Friday, February 11, 2005

Willful Ignorance A.K.A. Christianity

A significant portion of current religious expression is willful ignorance of reality. This purposeful eye aversion from contradicting evidence is dishonest: prayers for victory, prayer for the sick, prayer. This same stubborn self-imposed stupidity extends even into the christian stance on the bible. A christian will assert with enthusiasm that he believes the bible to be the infallible word of god, as if god possessed a body from which to vocalize, yet he will clearly and completely ignore directives and commands therein: giving possessions to the poor, divorce as adultery, and uncountable old testament commands (Jesus said clearly that these were still in effect). This is the same willful ignorance, a mental approach to reality, applied to the bible as applied to the world around them; voluntary and selective blindness to reality.

If a thing is real then it can be shown to be real through repeated examples of cause and effect, and if you do not practice all the commands of your source text then have the honesty to admit that it is not infallible. Christian actions are more honest than belief: listen to what they do and not what they say. They selectively apply the bible but won't admit it and in so doing cripple meaningful dialog about the positive aspects of their lifestyle.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Check out Emmanuel Swedenborg on the definition of faith - he said your faith is your life. There is no distinction between what you believe and what you do. It is all expressed by what you do.

Technomonk said...

Dear mister anonymous coward, please take note that there can be a difference between what you do and what you say.

Dad said...

Have you ever noticed the pock-marks, or dimples, covering the surface of a golf ball? They make the ball look imperfect. So, what's their purpose?

An aeronautical engineer who designs golf balls says that a perfectly smooth ball would travel only 130 yards off the tee. But the same ball with the right kind of dimples will fly twice that far. These apparent "flaws" minimize the ball's air resistance and allow it to travel much further.

Most of us can quickly name the physical characteristics we wish we had been born without. It's difficult to imagine that these "imperfections" are there for a purpose and are part of God's master design. Yet, when the psalmist wrote of God's creative marvel in the womb, he said to the Lord, "You formed my inward parts (Psalm 139:13) and "Your eyes saw my substance, being yet unformed (vs. 14). Then he said, "I will praise You, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made" (v. 14).

If we could accept our bodily "imperfections" as part of God's master plan for us, what a difference it would make in our outlook on life. The "dimples" we dislike may enable us to bring the greatest glory to our wise and loving Creator, who knows how to get the best out of our lives.

(I wonder if this would work for our view of the body of CHrist as well)
LJB

Dad said...

Have you ever noticed the pock-marks, or dimples, covering the surface of a golf ball? They make the ball look imperfect. So, what's their purpose?

An aeronautical engineer who designs golf balls says that a perfectly smooth ball would travel only 130 yards off the tee. But the same ball with the right kind of dimples will fly twice that far. These apparent "flaws" minimize the ball's air resistance and allow it to travel much further.

Most of us can quickly name the physical characteristics we wish we had been born without. It's difficult to imagine that these "imperfections" are there for a purpose and are part of God's master design. Yet, when the psalmist wrote of God's creative marvel in the womb, he said to the Lord, "You formed my inward parts (Psalm 139:13) and "Your eyes saw my substance, being yet unformed (vs. 14). Then he said, "I will praise You, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made" (v. 14).

If we could accept our bodily "imperfections" as part of God's master plan for us, what a difference it would make in our outlook on life. The "dimples" we dislike may enable us to bring the greatest glory to our wise and loving Creator, who knows how to get the best out of our lives.

(I wonder if this would work for our view of the body of CHrist as well)
LJB

Dad said...

Have you ever noticed the pock-marks, or dimples, covering the surface of a golf ball? They make the ball look imperfect. So, what's their purpose?

An aeronautical engineer who designs golf balls says that a perfectly smooth ball would travel only 130 yards off the tee. But the same ball with the right kind of dimples will fly twice that far. These apparent "flaws" minimize the ball's air resistance and allow it to travel much further.

Most of us can quickly name the physical characteristics we wish we had been born without. It's difficult to imagine that these "imperfections" are there for a purpose and are part of God's master design. Yet, when the psalmist wrote of God's creative marvel in the womb, he said to the Lord, "You formed my inward parts (Psalm 139:13) and "Your eyes saw my substance, being yet unformed (vs. 14). Then he said, "I will praise You, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made" (v. 14).

If we could accept our bodily "imperfections" as part of God's master plan for us, what a difference it would make in our outlook on life. The "dimples" we dislike may enable us to bring the greatest glory to our wise and loving Creator, who knows how to get the best out of our lives.

(I wonder if this would work for our view of the body of CHrist as well)
LJB

Anonymous said...

Have you ever noticed the pock-marks, or dimples, covering the surface of a golf ball? They make the ball look imperfect. So, what's their purpose?

An aeronautical engineer who designs golf balls says that a perfectly smooth ball would travel only 130 yards off the tee. But the same ball with the right kind of dimples will fly twice that far. These apparent "flaws" minimize the ball's air resistance and allow it to travel much further.

Most of us can quickly name the physical characteristics we wish we had been born without. It's difficult to imagine that these "imperfections" are there for a purpose and are part of God's master design. Yet, when the psalmist wrote of God's creative marvel in the womb, he said to the Lord, "You formed my inward parts (Psalm 139:13) and "Your eyes saw my substance, being yet unformed (vs. 14). Then he said, "I will praise You, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made" (v. 14).

If we could accept our bodily "imperfections" as part of God's master plan for us, what a difference it would make in our outlook on life. The "dimples" we dislike may enable us to bring the greatest glory to our wise and loving Creator, who knows how to get the best out of our lives.

(I wonder if this would work for our view of the body of CHrist as well)
LJB

Technomonk said...

The dimples in a golf ball are not imperfections but essential features of its nature.

Given the opportunity I would eliminate my physical imperfections.

I endeavor to correct and overcome my frailties. I hold the same opinion of the christian "body".