Thursday, January 12, 2006

Pain and Suffering

Pain and trouble are unavoidable aspects of human life. They are to be avoided but only to a certain point. Remove them from a child’s life and you will have a weak useless thing that the pack will leave behind. Remove them from your own life and you will eventually forget who you really are. You can not avoid all attachment (sorry Buddhists) and God will not answer all of your prayers (sorry Christians). Try as you might, you will suffer.

You will continue to suffer until you die. This is simple fact; it is not a problem to be fixed. Suffering is intrinsic to humanity; it forms us in ways that complement pleasure. You are half a man without both of these. Avoid suffering and you weaken. Avoid pleasure and you languish. Avoid them both and you become dead to life, waiting for your time to end.

All men suffer, and they naturally seek solace, comfort; ways to cope. Life brings pleasure and pain without regard to our health or capacities. It is up to the man who understands to balance his environment by administering pleasure and pain as he requires them.

The healthy man is strong and vital. He enjoys the pleasures of life, and grows strong from its pains. He is the master of himself when he can moderate his pleasure and his pain letting neither dominate, but keeping each energizing the other.

2 comments:

Tarun said...

I cannot accept suffering. I continue to hate & resist it. I don't know whether this is right or not.

“Whatever is material shape, past, future, present, subjective or objective, gross or subtle, mean or excellent, whether it is far or near — all material shape should be seen by perfect intuitive wisdom as it really is: “This is not mine, this I am not, this is not my self.” Whatever is feeling, whatever is perception, whatever are habitual tendencies, whatever is consciousness, past, future, present, subjective or objective, gross or subtle, mean or excellent, whether it is far or near — all should be seen by perfect intuitive wisdom as it really is: “This is not mine, this I am not, this is not my self.” - Buddha Gautama

Technomonk said...

“Mine” is such an early word in our vocabulary, and one of our primary social concepts. How much progress can we really make in saying “This is not mine, this I am not, this is not my self.”, and still remain able to compete and thrive in our societies?